Category Archives: Road Trips

Billy the Kid Trail

I-10 doesn’t have to be a long, boring drive… You’re a little ahead of schedule and you’ve got a few extra hours, so what’s your hurry? Why not take a side trip? Get off the Interstate and discover the real America… small towns, scenic coastlines, historic communities and some of the west coast’s most enjoyable roadtrips.

Billy the Kid Trail
Length: 84.0 mi / 135.2 km
Time: Two hours to drive the byway
Fees: None

Follow this byway through the rugged beauty of the million-acre Lincoln National Forest. From grassy plains to dense pine forests, the region is known for its stunning views and cool mountain climate. Visit historic Lincoln, once home to outlaw Billy the Kid and lawman Pat Garrett.

Billy the Kid Trail | I-10 Exit Guide

Driving the Byway

  • Begin in Ruidoso and follow NM-48 to Hwy 70.
  • Take Hwy 70 northeast to Hwy 380.
  • Travel on Hwy 380 northwest to junction with NM-220.
  • At the junction, take a small detour south through Fort Stanton and end up at the junction with NM-48.
  • Return to junction of Hwy 380 and NM-220.
  • Continue on Hwy 380 northwest to Capitan.
  • At the junction of Hwy 380 and NM-48, take a left onto NM-48 and continue south through Angus.
  • Continue on NM-48 south until you reach Ruidoso, the end of the byway loop.

On the road? Why not take us with you. Visit our growing family of exit guides:  I-4 Exit GuideI-5 Exit GuideI-10 Exit GuideI-75 Exit Guide, and I-95 Exit Guide. Detailed exit service listings… discount lodging, camping, food, gas and more for every exit along the way!

Arroyo Seco Historic Parkway

I-10 doesn’t have to be a long, boring drive… You’re a little ahead of schedule and you’ve got a few extra hours, so what’s your hurry? Why not take a side trip? Get off the Interstate and discover the real America… small towns, scenic coastlines, historic communities and some of the west coast’s most enjoyable roadtrips.

Arroyo Seco Historic Parkway
Length: 9.5 mi / 15.2 km
Time: During non-peak traffic hours, plan for twenty minutes to drive or one hour to see the entire byway.
Fees: None

The Arroyo Seco Parkway connects Los Angeles and Pasadena through the historic Arts and Crafts landscape of the Arroyo Seco. Conceived in the parkway tradition with gentle curves, lush landscaping, and scenic vistas, the byway incorporated the modern elements that would lay the groundwork for the California freeway system.

The Arroyo Seco Parkway, formerly known as the Pasadena Freeway, is the first freeway in the Western United States. It connects Los Angeles with Pasadena alongside the Arroyo Seco seasonal river. It is notable not only for being the first, mostly opened in 1940, but for representing the transitional phase between early parkways and modern freeways. It conformed to modern standards when it was built, but is now regarded as a narrow, outdated roadway. A 1953 extension brought the south end to the Four Level Interchange in downtown Los Angeles and a connection with the rest of the freeway system.

The road remains largely as it was on opening day, though the plants in its median have given way to a steel guard rail, and most recently to concrete barriers, and it now carries the designation State Route 110, not historic U.S. Route 66. Between 1954 and 2010, it was officially designated the Pasadena Freeway. In 2010, as part of plans to revitalize its scenic value and improve safety, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) restored the original name to the roadway. All the bridges built during parkway construction remain, as do four older bridges that crossed the Arroyo Seco before the 1930s. The Arroyo Seco Parkway is designated a State Scenic Highway, National Civil Engineering Landmark, and National Scenic Byway. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2011.

Arroyo Seco Historic Parkway | I-10 Exit Guide

 

Driving Directions: Begin at the Four Level, the intersection of US 101 and SR 110 (The Pasadena Freeway) in downtown Los Angeles.
Continue northbound on the Arroyo Seco Parkway (State Hwy 110).
Continue following the Parkway through Los Angeles to Pasadena.
End on Colorado Boulevard in the heart of historic Old Town Pasadena.


On the road? Why not take us with you. Visit our growing family of exit guides:  I-4 Exit GuideI-5 Exit GuideI-10 Exit GuideI-75 Exit Guide, and I-95 Exit Guide. Detailed exit service listings… discount lodging, camping, food, gas and more for every exit along the way!

Florida’s Big Bend Scenic Byway

Florida’s Big Bend Scenic Byway consists of two corridors, the Forest Trail and the Coastal Trail.

Back in the 1800s the Forest Trail was truly the “Wild West,” with cowboys, rustlers, Indians, trappers, and hard-scrabble farmers. Start the day walking through a pioneer farm and stop later at Fort Braden, a military outpost during the Second Seminole War. See rolling sand hills and hardwood forests give way to extensive stretches of pine forests, wetlands, and river floodplains. Come to the Apalachicola National Forest, which features the best remaining example of a native Longleaf Pine and Wiregrass ecosystem in the United States, as well as the largest population of the endangered Red-Cockaded Woodpecker. See the mysterious Dwarf Cypress Dome, where trees over 300 years old are only 6-15 feet tall.

The Coastal Trail was first discovered in 1528 by Panfilo de Narvaez and was occupied by Spanish, English, American, and Confederate forces. In the 1800s, the rivers were full of ships with cotton and timber bound for foreign markets. Later they were replaced by sponge, shrimp, crab, oyster, and fishing boats, which still ply these waters. This rich heritage beckons you to explore barrier islands, sand dunes, beaches, bays, coastal marshes, and springs of the Coastal Trail. Visit the Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park, one of the world’s largest and deepest fresh water springs. If geology is of interest to you, the interpretive trail at Leon Sinks Geological Site is a must. Created over millions of years, its Karst Topography of mysterious underground caverns and magical subterranean lakes make this site of global scientific interest.

Coastal Trail Section
To travel the Coastal Trail, begin on Market Street in Apalachicola at Scipio Creek Marina.

– Continue along Market Street to US 98/SR30/Avenue E in Apalachicola.
– Go to US 98/SR 30 (John Gorrie Memorial Bridge).
– Go to CR 65 in Eastpoint.
– On CR 65 (South Bayshore Drive), go southbound to SR 300.
– On SR 300 (Island Drive) go eastbound on CR 300 (East Gorrie Drive) from SR 300 to the entrance of Dr. Julian G. Bruce St. George Island State Park.
– Continue southbound on SR 300 to the east boundary of the state park.
– Return northbound along SR 300 from CR 65 to Patton Drive.
– On Patton Drive, go to US 98/US 319/SR 30.
– Go to SR 30-A in Carrabelle.
– On CR 30-A (Gulf Avenue) go from US 98/US 319/Sr 30 to US 319/SR 377 (Sopchoppy Highway).
– Go through the Franklin/Wakulla County Line, through Panacea, past US 319/SR 375, past US 319/SR 61, to SR 363.

Forest Trail Section
The Forest Trail section of the byway begins on SR 65 (James Gadsden highway) at US 98/US 319/SR 30 and goes to the Apalachicola National Forest Boundary.

– Go along SR 65 and come to the Franklin/Liberty County Line.
– Continue along the Sopchoppy Highway from the line to CR 299 (Curtis Mills Road).
– Travel from US 319/SR 377 to CR 22. Along CR 22 (Rose Street) go from CR 299 to CR 375 in Sopchoppy.
– On CR 375 go form the CR 22/CR 375 intersection to Winthrop Street, then go northbound on CR 375.
– From the Wakulla/Leon County Line, go eastbound along SR 20 and go to SR 263.
– Go to SR 267 at US 98/SR 30 and go to CR 373.
– From there, go back to the Wakulla/Leon County Line and travel along Springhill Road to SR 263 (Capital Circle).
– End at SR 20 (Blountstown Highway).